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Search Results 1 - 25 of 117. Results contain 465 matches


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Overview

Chinese philosophy

Any attempt to survey an intellectual tradition which encompasses more than four thousand years would be a daunting task even if it could be presumed that the reader ...

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Overview

Buddhist philosophy, Chinese

When Buddhism first entered China from India and Central Asia two thousand years ago, Chinese favourably disposed towards it tended to view it as a part or companion ...

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Overview

Japanese philosophy

The most distinctive characteristic of Japanese philosophy is how it has assimilated and adapted foreign philosophies to its native worldview. As an isolated island nation, Japan successfully resisted ...

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Buddhist philosophy, Japanese

Buddhism transformed Japanese culture and in turn was transformed in Japan. Mahāyāna Buddhist thought entered Japan from the East Asian continent as part of a cultural complex that ...

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Overview

Buddhist philosophy, Korean

Buddhism was transmitted to the Korean peninsula from China in the middle of the fourth century ad. Korea at this time was divided into three kingdoms: Kokuryô, ...

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Overview

East Asian philosophy

Sinitic civilization, which includes the Chinese-influenced cultures of Japan and Korea, established an early lead over the rest of the world in the development of its material culture ...

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Biographical

Maruyama Masao (1914–96)

Maruyama Masao was a political philosopher and scientist, and a pioneering historian of Japanese political thought. He provoked fierce controversy among his peers, analysing subjects such as war ...

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Thematic

Political philosophy, Confucian

Confucianism is a tradition of ethical and political thought in which ethics and politics are tightly connected. Confucianism endorses a politics of virtue that can be understood in ...

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Biographical

Nishida Kitarō (1870–1945)

Considered Japan’s first original modern philosopher, Nishida not only transmitted Western philosophical problems to his contemporaries but also used Buddhist philosophy and his own methods to subvert the ...

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Biographical

Ogyū Sorai (1666–1728)

Ogyū Sorai (1666–1728) was one of the greatest, most erudite and most Sinocentric kogaku, or ‘Ancient Learning’, philosophers of Tokugawa Japan. Sorai’s call for a return to ...

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Biographical

Tanabe Hajime (1885–1962)

Tanabe Hajime was a central figure of the so-called Kyoto School, and is generally acknowledged to be one of the most important philosophers of modern Japan. He held ...

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Biographical

Tominaga Nakamoto (1715–46)

Tominaga Nakamoto was a leading representative of what some scholars have called the eighteenth-century ‘enlightenment’ movement in Tokugawa thought. Nakamoto’s philological critiques of the historical development of Buddhist, ...

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Biographical

Watsuji Tetsurō (1890–1960)

Watsuji Tetsurō stands out as the leading thinker on ethics in twentieth century Japanese philosophy. He is regarded as a peripheral member of the ‘Kyoto School’ of philosophers ...

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Biographical

Kuki Shūzō (1888–1941)

Kuki’s philosophical project was focused on the issues arising from dualistic thinking. He incorporated into his work a cross-cultural, historical perspective, while applying Heidegger’s hermeneutical ontology and exhibiting ...

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Biographical

Nishitani Keiji (1900–90)

Nishitani Keiji is generally regarded as the leading light of the ‘second generation’ Kyoto School of modern Japanese philosophy. Influenced by Zen thinkers from Chinese and Japanese Buddhism ...

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Biographical

Kūkai (774–835)

Kūkai, also known by his posthumous honorific title Kōbō Daishi, was the founder of Japanese Shingon (‘truth word’ or ‘mantra’) Buddhism and is often considered the first comprehensive ...

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Biographical

Shinran (1173–1263)

Shinran lived in thirteenth-century Japan, an age of socio-political turmoil, when the old order represented by imperial rule, aristocratic culture and monastic Buddhism was in the process of ...

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Biographical

Nichiren (1222–82)

Fiery prophet, religious reformer, founder of a major religious movement, brilliant preacher and erudite writer, Nichiren is one of Japan’s most controversial religious figures. His thought derived from ...

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Thematic

Confucian philosophy, Korean

Confucianism came to Korea in the late fourth century ad. While Buddhism, which had arrived at the same time, was for centuries the central spiritual and intellectual ...

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Thematic

Sirhak

Sirhak refers to the reformist scholarship and thought in Korea during the latter half of the Chosôn (Yi) Dynasty (1392–1910). The term was coined in the twentieth century ...

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Thematic

Tonghak

Tonghak is an indigenous religion in Korea. Founded by Ch’oe Cheu (1824–64), it presently flourishes under the new name of Ch’ôndogyo. An eclectic religion, Tonghak borrowed from Confucianism, ...

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Biographical

Yi Hwang (1501–70)

Yi Hwang, also known by his honorific name T’oegye, is one of the two most honoured thinkers of the Korean neo-Confucian tradition. His fully balanced and integral grasp ...

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Biographical

Yi Yulgok (1536–84)

Yulgok was one of the foremost neo-Confucian scholars in Korea during the Yi (Chosôn) dynasty. He is considered one of two pillars, along with Yi T’oegye, of the ...

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Biographical

Chinul (1158–1210)

Chinul was the founder of the Korean Chogye school of Buddhism. He sought to reconcile the bifurcation between Kyo (doctrinal) thought and Sôn (Zen) practice that rent the ...

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Biographical

Wônhyo (617–86)

Wônhyo is one of the most important figures in Korean Buddhism, and a significant influence on the development of East Asian Buddhism in general. His lifework was the ...

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