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Austin, John (1790–1859)

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-T025-1
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-T025-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved November 16, 2018, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/austin-john-1790-1859/v-1

Article Summary

Although written in the early nineteenth century, Austin’s is probably the most coherent and sustained account of the theory of legal positivism. The complex relationships between legal positivism and the concepts of morality and politics are explored by him but are often neglected or misunderstood in modern commentaries.

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Citing this article:
Moles, Robert N.. Austin, John (1790–1859), 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-T025-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/austin-john-1790-1859/v-1.
Copyright © 1998-2018 Routledge.

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