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Hume, David (1711–76)

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-DB040-2
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2005
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-DB040-2
Version: v2,  Published online: 2005
Retrieved October 24, 2018, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/hume-david-1711-76/v-2

List of works

  • Hume, D. (1875) The Philosophical Works of David Hume, ed. T.H. Green and T.H. Grose, London: Longman, 4 vols.

    (The standard edition of Hume’s philosophical writings for several decades, with a long and largely unsympathetic introduction by Green; does not include The History of England, An Abstract of A Treatise of Human Nature, or Letter from a Gentleman to his Friend in Edinburgh.)

  • Hume, D. (1739–40) A Treatise of Human Nature: Being an Attempt to introduce the experimental Method of Reasoning into Moral Subjects, London, 2 vols; repr., ed. L.A. Selby-Bigge and P.H. Nidditch, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975.

    (Hume’s most complete presentation of his philosophy.)

  • Hume, D. (1740) An Abstract of a Book lately Published; Entitled, A Treatise of Human Nature, &c. Wherein the Chief Argument of that Book is farther Illustrated and Explained, London; repr., ed. J.M. Keynes and P. Sraffa, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1938.

    (An anonymous review of the Treatise, written by Hume, and rediscovered by Keynes and Sraffa.)

  • Hume, D. (1741–2) Essays, Moral and Political, Edinburgh, 2 vols.

    (Hume’s first set of essays.)

  • Hume, D. (1745) A Letter from a Gentleman to His Friend in Edinburgh: Containing Some Observations on A Specimen of the Principles concerning Religion and Morality, said to be maintain’d in a Book lately publish’d, intituled, A Treatise of Human Nature, &c., Edinburgh.

    (A pamphlet defence against charges made in the course of Hume’s candidacy for a chair at the University of Edinburgh.)

  • Hume, D. (1748) An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, first published as Philosophical Essays concerning Human Understanding, London; repr., Enquiries Concerning Human Understanding and Concerning the Principles of Morals, ed. L.A. Selby-Bigge and P.H. Nidditch, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1978.

    (Hume’s ‘recasting’ of Book 1 of the Treatise.)

  • Hume, D. (1751) An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, London repr., Enquiries Concerning Human Understanding and Concerning the Principles of Morals, ed. L.A. Selby-Bigge and P.H. Nidditch, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1978.

    (Hume’s ‘recasting’ of Book 3 of the Treatise.)

  • Hume, D. (1752) Political Discourses, Edinburgh.

    (Political essays.)

  • Hume, D. (1753) Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects, London, 2 vols.

    (A collection of most of the published essays and the two Enquiries; Hume supervised many editions through the course of his life.)

  • Hume, D. (1754–62) The History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution, London and Edinburgh, 6 vols.

    (Reprinted many times; Hume’s fame as a historian rivalled his fame as a philosopher during his lifetime.)

  • Hume, D. (1757) Four Dissertations, London.

    (Includes ‘The Natural History of Religion’, ‘Of the Passions’, ‘Of Tragedy’ and ‘Of the Standard of Taste’; all were included in later editions of Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects.)

  • Hume, D. (1777) My Own Life.

    (Also entitled The Life of David Hume, Esq. Written by Himself; a very short and engaging autobiographical essay, written when Hume knew he was dying.)

  • Hume, D. (1779) Dialogues concerning Natural Religion, Edinburgh.

    (Published after Hume’s death by his nephew after Adam Smith declined Hume’s request to publish the work.)

  • Hume, D. (1932) The Letters of David Hume, ed. J.Y.T. Greig, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2 vols.

    (Contains nearly all of Hume’s extant correspondence.)

  • Hume, D. (1954) New Letters of David Hume, ed. R. Klibansky and E.C. Mossner, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

  • Hume, D. (1985) Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary, ed. E.F. Miller, Indianapolis, IN: Liberty Classics.

    (The best current edition of Hume’s essays.)

  • Hume, D. (1998) An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, ed. T.L. Beauchamp, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (Part of the forthcoming Clarendon Edition of the Works of David Hume and now the standard critical edition of the Enquiry, superseding the P.H. Nidditch revision of the L.A. Selby-Bigge edition; cited in the entry as ‘EPM’.)

  • Hume, D. (2000a) An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, ed. T.L. Beauchamp, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (Part of the forthcoming Clarendon Edition of the Works of David Hume and now the standard critical edition of the Enquiry, superseding the P.H. Nidditch revision of the L.A. Selby-Bigge edition; cited in the entry as ‘EHU’.)

  • Hume, D. (2000b) A Treatise of Human Nature, ed. D.F. Norton and M.J. Norton, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    (Soon to appear in a critical edition as part of the forthcoming Clarendon Edition of the Works of David Hume, superseding the P.H. Nidditch revision of the L.A. Selby-Bigge edition; cited in the entry as ‘THN’.)

References and further reading

  • Árdal, P.S. (1966) Passion and Value in Hume’s ‘Treatise’, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

    (The classic study of Hume’s treatment of the passions in relation to his moral theory, connecting Books 2 and 3 of the Treatise.)

  • Baier, A.C. (1991) A Progress of Sentiments: Reflections on Hume’s ‘Treatise’, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    (Emphasizes the dialectical unity of the Treatise.)

  • Bailie, J. (2000) Hume on Morality, London: Routledge.

    (A good, concise introduction to Hume’s theory of morality and the passions.)

  • Beauchamp, T.L. and Rosenberg, A. (1981) Hume and the Problem of Causation, New York: Oxford University Press.

    (Focuses on the topics of induction and causation, and argues that Hume was not a sceptic about induction.)

  • Bennett, J.F. (2001) Learning from Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2 vols.

    (Contains stimulating critical discussion of many topics in Hume’s epistemology and metaphysics.)

  • Box, M.A. (1990) The Suasive Art of David Hume, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    (A treatment of Hume’s changing literary style.)

  • Bricke, J. (1996) Hume’s Moral Psychology, New York: Oxford University Press.

    (A carefully argued study of Hume’s theory of motivation in relation to morality, linking it to contemporary issues.)

  • Craig, E. (1979) David Hume: Eine Einführung in seine Philosophie, Frankfurt: Klostermann.

    (A good introduction in German.)

  • Craig, E. (1987) The Mind of God and the Works of Man, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    (Contains a fine account of Hume’s naturalistic project as a rejection of the philosophical tradition that considers human beings as created in the image of God; also a source for the interpretation of Hume as a sceptical realist.)

  • Earman, J. (2000) Hume’s Abject Failure: The Argument Against Miracles, New York: Oxford University Press.

    (A highly critical account of Hume’s argument concerning miracles, focusing on issues of probability theory.)

  • Flew, A. (1961) Hume’s Philosophy of Belief, New York: Humanities Press.

    (The only book-length commentary on An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding.)

  • Fogelin, R.J. (1985) Hume’s Skepticism in the ‘Treatise of Human Nature’, London and Boston, MA: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

    (An important, comprehensive treatment of its topic that carefully distinguishes kinds of scepticism and argues that Hume is an unmitigated sceptic about the rational warrant of beliefs.)

  • Fogelin, R.J. (2003) A Defense of Hume on Miracles, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    (A vigorous defence of the soundness of Hume’s position on miracles, particularly against objections by John Earman.)

  • Fodor, J.A. (2003) Hume Variations, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (A short, lively defence of the thesis that Hume was basically right about the cognitive architecture of the mind; written by a leading philosopher of mind.)

  • Forbes, D. (1975) Hume’s Philosophical Politics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (A valuable account of Hume’s political philosophy.)

  • Garrett, D. (1997) Cognition and Commitment in Hume’s Philosophy, New York: Oxford University Press.

    (Aims to resolve vexing interpretive puzzles on a range of philosophical topics in Hume by close attention to his cognitive psychology, revealing Hume to be more consistent than is often supposed.)

  • Gaskin, J.C.A. (1978) Hume’s Philosophy of Religion, New York: Macmillan.

    (A standard and comprehensive work on Hume’s philosophical views concerning religion.)

  • Hall, R. (1978) Fifty Years of Hume Scholarship: A Bibliographical Guide, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

    (Supplementary updates, by W.E. Morris, are published regularly in Hume Studies, published by The Hume Society.)

  • Herdt, J.A. (1997) Religion and Faction in Hume’s Moral Philosophy, New York: Cambridge University Press.

    (Emphasizes Hume’s concern with the social consequences of religion.)

  • Ikeda, S. (1986/1988) David Hume and Eighteenth Century British Thought, Tokyo: Chuo University Library, 2 vols.

    (A valuable bibliography.)

  • Jones, P. (1982) Hume’s Sentiments: Their Ciceronian and French Context, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

    (A good account of the insufficiently appreciated non-British context of Hume’s philosophy.)

  • Kemp Smith, N. (1941) The Philosophy of David Hume, London: Macmillan.

    (A landmark interpretation of Hume’s philosophy, and still in many ways the most comprehensive commentary on it; it treats the priority of sentiment over reason as the key to Hume’s philosophy and argues that his naturalism trumps his scepticism.)

  • Lecaldano, E. (1991) Hume e la nascita dell’etica contemporanea (Hume and the Origin of Modern Ethics), Biblioteca di cultura moderna, Laterza.

    (Treats Hume’s ethical theory in relation to contractarianism.)

  • Livingston, D. (1984) Hume’s Philosophy of Common Life, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

    (Emphasizes the importance of Hume’s History for understanding the narrative structure of thought.)

  • Loeb, L. (2002) Stability and Justification in Hume’s ‘Treatise’, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    (A stimulating contribution to the discussion of Hume’s epistemology that argues for the centrality of belief stability to his conception of justification.)

  • Mackie, J. (1980) Hume’s Moral Theory, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

    (A philosophically interesting treatment of Hume’s moral theory.)

  • Malherbe, M. (1976) La Philosophie Empiriste de David Hume (The Empiricist Philosophy of David Hume), Paris: Librairie philosophique J. Vrin.

    (A good general introduction emphasizing Hume’s empiricism.)

  • Millican, P. (2002) Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (A fine collection of essays covering the full range of topics in An Essay concerning Human Understanding.)

  • Mossner, E.C. (1954) The Life of David Hume, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (The classic biography; enjoyable reading.)

  • Mounce, H.O. (1999) Hume’s Naturalism, New York: Routledge.

    (An introductory treatment of naturalism, focusing on the Treatise and the Dialogues.)

  • Noonan, H.W. (1999) Hume on Knowledge, London: Routledge.

    (A good, concise introduction to Hume’s epistemology.)

  • Norton, D.F. (1982) David Hume: Common-Sense Moralist, Sceptical Metaphysician, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    (A rich account of Hume’s metaphysics and ethics in their historical context.)

  • Norton, D.F. (1993) The Cambridge Companion to Hume, New York: Cambridge University Press.

    (Excellent essays on various aspects of Hume’s thought, with a very good bibliography.)

  • O’Connor, D. (2001) Hume on Religion, New York: Routledge.

    (A good, concise introduction to the Dialogues concerning Natural Religion.)

  • Owen, D. (1999) Hume’s Reason, New York: Oxford University Press.

    (An important analysis of Hume’s conception of reason as applied to such central topics as induction, belief in bodies and scepticism, in the context of non-formalist, early modern theories of reasoning; essential reading.)

  • Passmore, J.A. (1952) Hume’s Intentions, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Examines several large-scale aspects of Hume’s philosophy, such as associationism and scepticism, which are judged difficult to reconcile.)

  • Pears, D. (1990) Hume’s System: An Examination of the First Book of His ‘Treatise’, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    (An accessible philosophical treatment of a few central aspects of Hume’s epistemology and metaphysics.)

  • Penelhum, T.H. (1975) Hume, London: Macmillan.

    (A clear introduction.)

  • Phillipson, N. (1989) Hume, London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson.

    (Focuses on Hume as a historian.)

  • Price, H.H. (1940) Hume’s Theory of the External World, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (The only book-length treatment of Hume’s account of belief in bodies, written at a time when phenomenalism was still influential.)

  • Read, R.J. and Richman, K.A. (2000) The New Hume Debate, London: Routledge.

    (A collection of essays, some of them not previously published, on the question of Hume’s ‘realism’ about causality and causal necessity; includes important essays by S. Blackburn, G. Strawson, E. Craig and K. Winkler.)

  • Russell, P. (1995) Freedom and Moral Sentiment, New York: Oxford University Press.

    (The best study of Hume’s treatment of ‘liberty and necessity’, emphasizing its close relation to his sentiment-based theory of moral responsibility.)

  • Snare, F. (1991) Morals, Motivation and Convention: Hume’s Influential Doctrines, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Particularly interesting on convention and the artificial virtues.)

  • Strawson, G. (1989) The Secret Connexion: Causation, Realism, and David Hume, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (A vigorous and much-discussed interpretation of Hume as maintaining the existence of real causal powers that underlie constant conjunction.)

  • Streminger, G. (1994) David Hume: Sein Leben und Sein Werk (David Hume: His Life and Work), Paderborn, Munich, Vienna and Zurich: Ferdinand Schöningh.

    (A good account of Hume’s life and writings.)

  • Stroud, B. (1977) Hume, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

    (Still one of the very best and philosophically most astute commentaries on Hume’s philosophy.)

  • Whelan, F.G. (1985) Order and Artifice in Hume’s Political Philosophy, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    (One of the best and most important treatments of Hume’s political philosophy.)

  • Wright, J. (1983) The Sceptical Realism of David Hume, Manchester: Manchester University Press.

    (A seminal early defence of the interpretation of Hume as maintaining the existence of real causal powers in the external world, despite the radical inadequacy of our ideas to conceive them; also emphasizes the influence of Malebranche.)

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Citing this article:
Garrett, Don. Bibliography. Hume, David (1711–76), 2005, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-DB040-2. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/hume-david-1711-76/v-2/bibliography/hume-david-1711-76-bib.
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