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Isaac of Stella (d. c.1177)

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-B057-1
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-B057-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved March 01, 2021, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/isaac-of-stella-d-c-1177/v-1

Article Summary

Like other twelfth-century Cistercians, Isaac of Stella was well versed in secular learning. Centrally engaged with the contemplative life, he expresses his spiritual insights in terms of the science of his day, and combines a spiritual psychology derived from Johannes Scottus Eriugena and Hugh and Richard of St Victor with an anthropology grounded in Stoic physics, Greek and Arab medicine, and a cosmic model derived from Plato’s Timaeus. A unifying theme of his writings is the relation between the physical and spiritual dimensions of human experience.

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Citing this article:
Wetherbee, Winthrop. Isaac of Stella (d. c.1177), 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-B057-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/isaac-of-stella-d-c-1177/v-1.
Copyright © 1998-2021 Routledge.

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