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Linji (810/15–67)

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-G038-1
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-G038-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved July 15, 2019, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/linji-810-15-67/v-1

Article Summary

Linji was one of the most reputed, and influential Chinese Chan masters in the history of East Asian Buddhism. He belonged to a school which advocates sudden enlightenment without dependence on words: there is an extralinguistic reality that can be intuitively apprehended through the rigorous meditative training. A person with this intuition escapes dualistic thinking and has grasped the freedom to act decisively, utilizing creatively whatever is presented before him/her. Linji’s method of teaching is often characterized as ‘thundering shouts and showering sticks’, actions which are used to effect an awakening in his disciples. His reputation rests primarily on his ability to seize on this opportunity.

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Citing this article:
Nagatomo, Shigenori. Linji (810/15–67), 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-G038-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/linji-810-15-67/v-1.
Copyright © 1998-2019 Routledge.

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