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Plato (427–347 BC)

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-A088-1
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DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-A088-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved October 23, 2019, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/plato-427-347-bc/v-1

List of works

  • Plato (390s–347) Platonis Opera, ed. J. Burnet, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1900–7, 5 vols.

    (The classic Oxford Classical Texts edition of the Greek text of all Plato’s works, including those frequently regarded as spurious or dubious; follows the Thrasyllan organization of the corpus adopted in the manuscript tradition.)

  • Plato (390s–347) Platonis Opera, vol. 1, Euthyphro, Apologia Socratis, Crito, Phaedo, Cratylus, Theaetetus, Sophistes, Politicus, ed. E.A. Duke, W.F. Hicken, W.S.M. Nicoll, D.B. Robinson and J.C.G. Strachan, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995.

    (The first volume of a new Oxford Classical Text, designed to replace Burnet’s 1900–7 edition.)

  • Plato (390s–347) The Collected Dialogues of Plato including the Letters, ed. E. Hamilton and H. Cairns, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1961.

    (Useful one-volume collection of translations by various hands; excludes a few of the dialogues generally regarded as spurious.)

  • Plato (390s–347) Plato: Complete Works, ed. J.M. Cooper, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett, 1997.

    (The most complete one-volume collection, with translations by various hands; includes Spuria and Dubia, introductions and bibliography; many dialogues are also available separately in paperback editions.)

Any chronological order for Plato’s writings is speculative. That given below reflects the view of Plato taken in this entry. The list includes all the works generally agreed to be authentic, and one or two that may be inauthentic.

  • Plato (c.395–387) Ion, trans. and ed. T.J. Saunders, in Plato: Early Socratic Dialogues, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1987.

    (Includes bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.395–387) Hippias Minor, trans. R. Waterfield, in T.J. Saunders (ed.) Plato: Early Socratic Dialogues, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1987.

    (Includes bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.395–387) Crito, ed. J. Burnet, in Plato’s Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates, and Crito, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1924; trans. R.E. Allen, Socrates and Legal Obligation, Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1970.

    (The former contains notes on the Greek text, the latter notes and essays.)

  • Plato (c.395–387) Apology, ed. J. Burnet, in Plato’s Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates, and Crito, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1924; trans. R.E. Allen, Socrates and Legal Obligation, Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1970.

    (The former contains notes on the Greek text, the latter notes and essays.)

  • Plato (c.395–387) Gorgias, ed. E.R. Dodds, Plato Gorgias, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959; trans. T.H. Irwin, Plato: Gorgias, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2nd edn, 1995; trans. R. Waterfield, Plato Gorgias, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

    (A major work of scholarship, Dodds includes introduction, summaries and full commentary on the Greek text; Irwin and Waterfield include bibliographies.)

  • Plato (c.386–380) Menexenus, trans. and ed. R.G. Bury, in Plato: Timaeus, Critias, Cleitophon, Menexenus, Epistles, Loeb Classical Library, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press and London: Heinemann, 1929.

    (Greek text with facing English translation.)

  • Plato (c.386–380) Euthyphro, ed. J. Burnet, in Plato’s Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates, and Crito, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1924; trans. R.E. Allen, Plato’s ’Euthyphro’ and the Earlier Theory of Forms, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1970.

    (The former contains notes on the Greek text, the latter commentary and essays.)

  • Plato (c.386–380) Laches, trans. I. Lane, in T.J. Saunders (ed.) Plato: Early Socratic Dialogues, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1987.

    (Includes bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.386–380) Charmides, trans. D. Watt, in T.J. Saunders (ed.) Plato: Early Socratic Dialogues, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1987.

    (Includes bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.386–380) Protagoras, trans. B. Jowett, revised M. Ostwald, Plato Protagoras, Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill, 1956; trans. C.C.W. Taylor, Plato: Protagoras, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2nd edn, 1991.

    (Ostwald includes a classic essay by G. Vlastos as introduction; Taylor includes notes and bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.386–380) Meno, ed. R.S. Bluck, Plato’s Meno, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; ed. and trans. R.W. Sharples, Plato: Meno, Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1985; trans. J.M. Day, Plato’s Meno in Focus, London and New York: Routledge, 1994.

    (Bluck includes introduction and commentary on the Greek text; Sharples includes notes and bibliography; Day has both introduction and bibliography as well as essays by various hands.)

  • Plato (c.386–380) Symposium, ed. R.G. Bury, The Symposium of Plato, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2nd edn, 1932; ed. K.J. Dover, Plato: Symposium, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980; trans. A. Nehamas and P. Woodruff, Plato: Symposium, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett, 1989; trans. R. Waterfield, Plato Symposium, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

    (Both Bury and Dover include introductions and notes on the Greek text; also Nehamas and Woodruff, and Waterfield, include introduction and bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.386–380) Phaedo, ed. C.J. Rowe, Plato: Phaedo, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995; trans. R. Hackforth, Plato’s Phaedo, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1955; trans. D. Gallop, Plato Phaedo, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.

    (Rowe includes introduction, notes on the Greek text and bibliography; Hackforth offers commentary; Gallop includes notes and bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.380–367) Hippias Major, ed. D. Tarrant, The Hippias Major attributed to Plato, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1928; trans. P. Woodruff, Plato: Hippias Major, Oxford: Blackwell, 1982.

    (The former offers Greek text with introduction and commentary; the latter includes introduction, essays and bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.380–367) Republic, ed. J. Adam, rev. D.A. Rees, The Republic of Plato, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1963, 2 vols; trans. P. Shorey, Plato: Republic, Loeb Classical Library, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press and London: Heinemann, 1930, 2 vols; trans. A.D. Lindsay, revised T.H. Irwin, Plato: Republic, London: Dent, 1992.

    (Adam includes Greek text with notes; the Loeb edition has Greek text with facing English version; Lindsay includes introduction and bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.380–367) Cratylus, ed. L. Méridier, Platon: Cratyle, Budé series, Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 3rd edn, 1961; trans. H.N. Fowler, in Plato: Cratylus, Parmenides, Greater Hippias, Lesser Hippias, Loeb Classical Library, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press and London: Heinemann, 1926.

    (Méridier offers Greek text with facing French translation, introduction and notes; Fowler has Greek text with facing English translation)

  • Plato (c.380–367) Euthydemus, ed. E.H. Gifford, The Euthydemus of Plato, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1905; trans. R.K. Sprague, Plato, Euthydemus, Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill, 1985; trans. R. Waterfield, in T.J. Saunders (ed.) Plato: Early Socratic Dialogues, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1987.

    (Gifford includes Greek text with notes; Sprague and Waterfield both include bibliographies.)

  • Plato (c.380–367) Lysis, trans. D. Bolotin, Plato’s Dialogue on Friendship, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1979; trans. D. Watt, in T.J. Saunders (ed.) Plato: Early Socratic Dialogues, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1987.

    (Both include bibliographies.)

  • Plato (c.380–367) Parmenides, trans. F.M. Cornford, Plato and Parmenides, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1939; trans. M.L. Gill and P. Ryan, Plato: Parmenides, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett, 1996.

    (Cornford supplies a running commentary; Gill and Ryan include substantial introductory essay and bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.380–367) Theaetetus, ed. L. Campbell, The Theaetetus of Plato, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1883; trans. J.H. McDowell, Plato: Theaetetus, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1973; trans. M.J. Levett, revised M. Burnyeat, The Theaetetus of Plato, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett, 1990.

    (Campbell includes Greek text and notes; Burnyeat includes bibliography and book-length introductory essay of classic status.)

  • Plato (c.366–360) Phaedrus, ed. and trans. C.J. Rowe, Plato: Phaedrus, Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1986; trans. A. Nehamas and P. Woodruff, Plato: Phaedrus, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett, 1995.

    (Both includes bibliographies; the latter also includes an introduction.)

  • Plato (c.366–360) Timaeus, ed. A. Rivaud, Platon: Timée, Critias, Budé series, Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1925; trans. F.M. Cornford, Plato’s Cosmology, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1937.

    (The former has Greek text with facing French translation, introduction and notes; the latter includes commentary of classic status.)

  • Plato (c.366–360) Critias, ed. C. Gill, Plato: The Atlantis Story, Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1980; trans. H.D.P. Lee, Plato: Timaeus and Critias, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1971.

    (Gill includes introduction and commentary.)

  • Plato (c.366–360) Sophist, ed. L. Campbell, The Sophistes and Politicus of Plato, Oxford: Clarendon, 1867; trans. F.M. Cornford, Plato’s Theory of Knowledge, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1935; trans. N.P. White, Plato: The Sophist, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett, 1993.

    (Campbell’s is the classic edition, especially for the introduction on Plato’s late style, and includes notes on the Greek text; White includes introduction and bibliography, Cornford a running commentary.)

  • Plato (c.366–360) Statesman (Politicus), ed. L. Campbell, The Sophistes and Politicus of Plato, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1867; trans. J.B. Skemp, Plato: The Statesman, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1952; ed. and trans. C.J. Rowe, Plato: Statesman, Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1995.

    (Campbell’s is the classic edition, especially for the introduction on Plato’s late style; Skemp offers a substantial introduction; Rowe includes bibliography and notes.)

  • Plato (c.360–347) Philebus, ed. R.G. Bury, The Philebus of Plato, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1897; trans. R. Hackforth, Plato’s Examination of Pleasure, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1945; trans. J.C.B. Gosling, Plato: Philebus, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975; trans. D. Frede, Plato: Philebus, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett, 1993.

    (Bury offers notes on the Greek text, Hackforth a commentary, Gosling and Frede include substantial introductions and bibliography.)

  • Plato (c.360–347) Seventh Letter, ed. R.S. Bluck, Plato’s Seventh and Eighth Letters, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1947; trans. W. Hamilton, Plato: Phaedrus and Letters VII and VIII, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1973.

    (Bluck includes Greek text with notes.)

  • Plato (c.360–347) Laws, ed. E.B. England, The Laws of Plato, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1921, 2 vols; trans. T.J. Saunders, Plato: Laws, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1970.

    (England includes Greek text with notes; Saunders includes introduction, summaries and bibliography.)

References and further reading

  • Allen, R.E. (1965) Studies in Plato’s Metaphysics, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

    (A collection of mostly seminal essays by various hands.)

  • Aristoxenus (late 4th century) Harmonics, trans H.S. Macran, The Harmonics of Aristoxenus, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1902.

    (Contains Greek text and English translation, with introduction and notes.)

  • Brandwood, L. (1990) The Chronology of Plato’s Dialogues, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (A sober critical history of the stylometric study of Plato, including assessments of the work of Campbell and Ritter.)

  • Burnyeat, M.F. (1987) ‘Platonism and mathematics: a prelude to discussion’, in A. Graeser (ed.) Mathematics and Metaphysics in Aristotle, Bern and Stuttgart: Paul Haupt Verlag, 213–240.

    (A challenging re-evaluation of Plato’s treatment of the epistemological and ontological status of mathematics, including a new approach to the ‘unwritten doctrines’.)

  • Campbell, L. (1867) The Sophistes and Politicus of Plato, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (Includes a pioneering introductory essay on Plato’s late style.)

  • Diogenes Laertius (c. early 3rd century) Lives of the Philosophers, trans. R.D. Hicks, Diogenes Laertius: Lives of Eminent Philosophers, Loeb Classical Library, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press and London: Heinemann, 1925, 2 vols.

    (Greek text with facing English translation; book III contains Diogenes’ life of Plato.)

  • Friedländer, P. (1958, 1964, 1969) Plato, trans. H. Meyerhoff, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 3 vols.

    (An account of the dialogues particularly recommended for its treatment of the philosophical significance of their literary characteristics.)

  • Gaiser, K. (1968) Platon’s ungeschriebene Lehre (Plato’s Unwritten Teaching), Stuttgart: Ernst Klett, 2nd edn.

    (An authoritative statement of the Tübingen interpretation of Plato.)

  • Gaiser, K. (1980) ‘Plato’s enigmatic Lecture “On The Good”’, Phronesis 25: 5–37.

    (A lucid restatement in English of the Tübingen interpretation.)

  • Grote, G. (1867) Plato and the Other Companions of Sokrates, London: John Murray, 2nd edn, 3 vols.

    (An unrivalled account of the dialogues by the greatest nineteenth-century Plato scholar.)

  • Grube, G. (1980) Plato’s Thought, London: Athlone Press.

    (Accessible introductory account of Plato’s thought, with new introduction and bibliography by D. Zeyl.)

  • Guthrie, W.K.C. (1975, 1978) A History of Greek Philosophy, vol. 4, Plato, The Man and his Dialogues: Earlier Period, vol. 5, The Later Plato and the Academy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (The Plato volumes of the most detailed and comprehensive English-language account of Greek philosophy; indispensable for bibliography and general orientation; volume 5 includes an assessment of the Tübingen school’s interpretation of Plato.)

  • Irwin, T.H. (1995) Plato’s Ethics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    (A major philosophical study.)

  • Kahn, C.H. (1996) Plato and The Socratic Dialogue, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (An important study questioning developmental assumptions in standard accounts of the chronology of the dialogues.)

  • Kraut, R. (1992) The Cambridge Companion to Plato, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Useful collection of essays by different authors on many aspects of Plato’s work; includes extensive bibliography.)

  • Owen, G.E.L. (1953) ’The Place of the Timaeus in Plato’s Dialogues’, Classical Quarterly 3: 79–95; repr. in R.E. Allen, Studies in Plato’s Metaphysics, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1965, 313–338; repr. in G.E.L. Owen, Logic, Science and Dialectic, London: Duckworth, 1986, 65–84.

    (Controversial attempt to interpret Timaeus as a middle-period dialogue.)

  • Price, A.W. (1995) Mental Conflict, London: Routledge.

    (An exploration of the theories of mind devised by Greek philosophers to account for psychological conflict.)

  • Popper, K.R. (1966) The Open Society and its Enemies, vol. 1, The Spell of Plato, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 5th edn.

    (The most influential work on Plato in the twentieth century; attacks Plato’s political thought as totalitarian.)

  • Ritter, C. (1888) Untersuchungen über Platon: die Echtheit und Chronologie der Platonischen Schriften (Researches into Plato: The Authenticity and Chronology of the Platonic Writings), Stuttgart: Kohlhammer.

    (The best example of a sustained use of stylistic criteria to determine questions of chronology and authenticity.)

  • Ross, W.D. (1951) Plato’s Theory of Ideas, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (Particularly valuable for its review of the evidence for Plato’s ‘unwritten doctrines’.)

  • Scott, D. (1995) Recollection and Experience: Plato’s Theory of Learning and its Successors, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Important for its exegesis of Platonic ‘recollection’ and of the philosophical tradition it inaugurated.)

  • Thesleff, H. (1982) Studies in Platonic Chronology, Helsinki: Societas Scientiarum Fennica.

    (Speculations premised on the assumption that many dialogues are revisions of earlier versions.)

  • Vlastos, G. (1981) Platonic Studies, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2nd edn.

    (Penetrating essays by a leading scholar.)

  • Vlastos, G. (1991) Socrates: Ironist and Moral Philosopher, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (A study of the Socrates of the early dialogues.)

  • Williams, B. (1998) Plato: The Invention of Philosophy, London: Phoenix.

    (A succinct but penetrating popular introduction to Plato, attractively written by a leading twentieth century philosopher.)

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Citing this article:
Schofield, Malcolm. Bibliography. Plato (427–347 BC), 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-A088-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/plato-427-347-bc/v-1/bibliography/plato-427-347-bc-bib.
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