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Proudhon, Pierre-Joseph (1809–65)

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-DC060-1
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-DC060-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved May 07, 2021, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/proudhon-pierre-joseph-1809-65/v-1

Article Summary

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon was a French social theorist, political activist and journalist. Claiming to be the first person to adopt the label ‘anarchist’, he developed a vision of a cooperative society conducting its affairs by just exchanges and without political authority. In his lifetime he exercised considerable influence over both militants and theorists of the European left, and he is remembered today as one of the greatest exponents of libertarian socialism. His last writings, though still strongly libertarian, advocated a federal state with minimal functions.

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Citing this article:
Vernon, Richard. Proudhon, Pierre-Joseph (1809–65), 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-DC060-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/proudhon-pierre-joseph-1809-65/v-1.
Copyright © 1998-2021 Routledge.

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