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Ulrich of Strasbourg (c.1220/5–1277)

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-B111-1
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-B111-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved October 05, 2022, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/ulrich-of-strasbourg-c-1220-5-1277/v-1

Article Summary

A Dominican theologian and philosopher and a student of Albert The Great, Ulrich was well known for a widely studied summa theologiae, De summo bono (On the Supreme Good), which represents an advance over previous summae in plan and organization. Ulrich provides a rich synthesis of Christian Neoplatonic theology and mysticism by systematizing the Aristotelianized Neoplatonic philosophical theologies of Albert the Great, Pseudo-Dionysius’ De divinis nominibus and the Liber de causis. He exercised a notable influence on the Rhineland mystics.

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Citing this article:
Bussanich, John. Ulrich of Strasbourg (c.1220/5–1277), 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-B111-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/ulrich-of-strasbourg-c-1220-5-1277/v-1.
Copyright © 1998-2022 Routledge.

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