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Buddhist philosophy, Korean

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-G201-1
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-G201-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved July 04, 2022, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/overview/buddhist-philosophy-korean/v-1

References and further reading

  • Buswell, R. (1983) The Korean Approach to Zen: The Collected Works of Chinul, Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii Press.

    (This work includes a brief outline of Korean Buddhism before Sôn, but mainly deals with Chinul’s life and works. It includes an English translation of most of the major works of Chinul, and a bibliography of works on Korean Buddhism written in Asian languages.)

  • Ha Tae-hung and Mintz, G. (1972) Samguk Yusa: Legend and History of the Three Kingdoms of Ancient Korea, Seoul: Yonsei University Press.

    (This is a translation of the Samguk Yusa, one of the most important historical sources for studying Korean Buddhist history during the Three Kingdoms period and the Unified Silla period. The original work in classical Chinese was written by monk Iryon in the thirteenth century.)

  • Han’guk Pulgyo Chônsô (Complete Collection of Korean Buddhist Works) (1979–89), Seoul: Dongguk University Press.

    (This complete collection of Korean Buddhist works is the most recent critical edition of Korean Buddhist works from the Silla period to the Chosôn period.)

  • Kamstra, J.H. (1967) Encounter or Syncretism: The Early Growth of Japanese Buddhism, Leiden: Brill.

    (Part 3 includes a very useful survey of Korean Buddhism from its beginnings to the period of its introduction into Japan in the sixth century.)

  • Keel Hee-sung (1977) ‘Chinul: The Founder of Korean Son (Zen)’, Ph.D. dissertation, Harvard University.

    (Discusses Chinul’s contribution to Korean Sôn and the uniqueness of the Korean Sôn tradition.)

  • Korean Buddhist Research Institute (ed.) (1993) The History and Culture of Buddhism in Korea, Seoul: Dongguk University Press.

    (This edited translation of works on Korean Buddhism covers the Three Kingdoms period to modern times.)

  • Lancaster, L. and Yu Chai-shin (1989) Introduction of Buddhism to Korea, Studies in Korean Religions and Culture vol. 3, Berkeley, CA: Asian Humanities Press.

    (This edited English translation of articles on Korean Buddhism, originally written in Korean or Japanese, is a very useful guide for studying Korean Buddhism during the Three Kingdoms period and has a comprehensive bibliography.)

  • Lancaster, L. and Yu Chai-shin (1991) Assimilation of Buddhism in Korea: Religious Maturity and Innovation in the Silla Dynasty, Studies in Korean Religions and Culture vol. 4, Berkeley, CA: Asian Humanities Press.

    (This volume covers Korean Buddhism during the Unified Silla period.)

  • Lancaster, L. and Sung Bae-park (1979) The Korean Buddhist Canon: A Descriptive Catalogue, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

    (This compiles all basic bibliographical information concerning Buddhist classical texts in Chinese.)

  • Lee, P. (1993) Sourcebook of Korean Civilization: From Early Times to the Sixteenth Century, New York: Columbia University Press.

    (This includes various excerpts from classical works, originally in classical Chinese. It includes an English translation of important Buddhist philosophical exegeses.)

  • Lee, P. (1969) Lives of Eminent Korean Monks: The Haedong Kosung Chon, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    (This is a translation of the biographies of eminent monks of the Three Kingdoms period. The original work in classical Chinese was written by Kakhun during the Koryô period.)

  • Odin, S. (1982) Process Metaphysics and Hua-Yen Buddhism: A Critical Study of Cumulative Penetration Vs. Interpenetration, Albany, NY: State University of New York.

    (This comparative study of Huayan Buddhism and Whitehead’s process philosophy includes in its appendix a translation of Ûisang’s autocommentary on the Ocean Seal Samādhi.)

  • Park Sung-bae (1983) Buddhist Faith and Sudden Enlightenment, Albany, NY: State University of New York.

    (This is a most provocative discussion of Korean Sôn practice, presenting the spirit of Buddhist meditation in the East Asian tradition and also ably depicting the uniqueness of Korean Sôn practice.)

  • Shim Jae-ryong (1979) ‘The Philosophical Foundation of Korean Zen Buddhism: The Integration of Son and Kyo by Chinul’, Ph.D. dissertation, University of Hawaii.

    (Discusses Chinul’s contribution to Korean Sôn and the uniqueness of the Korean Sôn tradition.)

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Citing this article:
Cho, Sungtaek. Bibliography. Buddhist philosophy, Korean, 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-G201-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/overview/buddhist-philosophy-korean/v-1/bibliography/buddhist-philosophy-korean-bib.
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