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American philosophy in the 18th and 19th centuries

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-DC096-1
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-DC096-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved June 19, 2019, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/american-philosophy-in-the-18th-and-19th-centuries/v-1

References and further reading

Works and English translations of philosophers mentioned in the text and not included here can be found in the individual biographical entries throughout the Encyclopedia.

  • Appleby, J. (1984) Capitalism and a New Social Order: The Republican Vision of the 1790s, New York: New York University Press.

    (Argues that Jeffersonian democracy was the triumph in America of an economic individualism rooted in the political thought of John Locke.)

  • Bailyn, B. (1973) The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution, Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

    (The book that discovered the roots of Revolutionary thought in ‘country ideology’ – the local variant of classical republicanism that the colonists imported from England.)

  • Boorstin, D. (1964) The Americans: The Colonial Experience, New York: Vintage Books.

    (The American Revolution as the ideological triumph of Lockean liberal individualism.)

  • Cameron, S. (1985) Writing Nature: Henry Thoreau’s Journal, New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    (A fine literary study, discussing the relation of Thoreau’s immense journal to nature, to his audience and to Walden.)

  • Cavell, S. (1980) The Senses of Walden, An Expanded Edition, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

    (A pioneering study of Thoreau as a philosopher of language and knowledge. The essays ‘Thinking of Emerson’ and ‘An Emerson Mood’ explore Emerson’s epistemology and his relation to Heidegger.)

  • Cavell, S. (1988) In Quest of the Ordinary: Lines of Skepticism and Romanticism, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

    (Contains ‘Being Odd, Getting Even,’ an existentialist reading of Emerson’s ‘Self-Reliance’, and ‘The Philosopher in American Life’, discussing the ‘repression’ of Emerson and Thoreau in accounts of American philosophy and culture.)

  • Cavell, S. (1990) Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome: The Constitution of Emersonian Perfectionism, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

    (Moral and political aspects of Emerson’s thought.)

  • Clebsch, W. (1973) American Religious Thought, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

    (Readable and sympathetic account, emphasizing continuities among Edwards, Emerson and James.)

  • Conkin, P.K. (1968) Puritans and Pragmatists: Eight Eminent American Thinkers, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

    (Fine study of Edwards, Franklin, Adams, Emerson, Peirce, James, Dewey and Santayana by a distinguished historian.)

  • Coughlan, N. (1975) Young John Dewey, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

    (Superb short account of Dewey’s development and career to 1894, when he began teaching at the University of Chicago.)

  • Dewey, J. (1897) ‘My Pedagogic Creed’, School Journal 54: 77–80; repr. in The Early Works of John Dewey, ed. J.A. Boydston, Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1969–90, vol. 5, 84–95.

    (Dewey maintains that education must proceed through ‘forms of life’ that are ‘worth living for their own sake’.)

  • Dowling, W.C. (1990) Poetry and Ideology in Revolutionary Connecticut, Athens, GA and London: University of Georgia Press.

    (Excellent survey of relations between classical republican political theory and poetry during the Revolution and early republic.)

  • Dunn, J. (1969) ‘The Politics of Locke in England and America in the Eighteenth Century’, in J.W. Yolton (ed.) John Locke: Problems and Perspectives, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 45–80.

    (First important allegation of Locke’s non-importance in eighteenth-century political theory in both England and America.)

  • Fiering, N. (1981) Moral Philosophy at Seventeenth-Century Harvard, Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press.

    (Discusses the yielding of scholastic premises to Hutchesonian moral sense theory between 1650 and 1725.)

  • Flower, E. and Murphey, M.G. (1977) A History of Philosophy in America, New York: Capricorn Books, 2 vols.

    (Volume 1 contains important chapters on Jonathan Edwards and the development of Scottish common sense philosophy in the American context. Volume 2 discusses the St. Louis Hegelians, Peirce, James, Royce, Santayana and Dewey.)

  • Goodman, R.B. (1990a) American Philosophy and the Romantic Tradition, Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press.

    (Challenges the view that American philosophy originates with the Puritans by considering the influence of Romantic poetry and philosophy on Emerson, James and Dewey.)

  • Goodman, R.B. (1990b) ‘East-West Philosophy in Nineteenth Century America: Emerson and Hinduism’, Journal of the History of Ideas 1990: 625–645.

    (Discussion of Emerson’s interest in and use of Hindu texts in such essays as ‘Plato, or the Philosopher’.)

  • Guelzo, A.C. (1989) Edwards on the Will: A Century of American Theological Debate, Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press.

    (Summary account of Edwards’ New Divinity and its Historiography.)

  • Hamilton, A. (and Madison, J.) (1787–8) The Federalist Papers, ed. C. Rossiter, New York: New American Library, 1961.

    (A defence of the new United States Constitution and the federal government it represents.)

  • Hartz, L. (1955) The Liberal Tradition in American History: An Interpretation of American Political Thought Since the Revolution, New York: Harcourt Brace.

    (The locus classicus of the ‘Lockean liberal’ interpretation of the American Revolution.)

  • James, W. (1878) ‘Remarks on Spencer’s Definition of Mind as Correspondence’; repr. in The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1979.

  • James, W. (1879) ‘The Sentiment of Rationality’, Mind 4: 317–346; repr. in The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1979.

    (Characterizes the sentiment of rationality as a feeling of ease, peace and rest, the result of a transition from a state of perplexity to one of lively relief and pleasure.)

  • Kuklick, B. (1977) The Rise of American Philosophy: Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1860–1930, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

    (A history of the great Harvard department of James, Royce and others; excellent bibliography.)

  • Kuklick, B. (1985) Churchmen and Philosophers, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

    (Traces continuing religious strains in American thought from Edwards through Dewey; contains a bibliographic essay.)

  • McCoy, D. (1980) The Elusive Republic: Political Economy in Jeffersonian America, Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press.

    (Traces the influence of Rousseau and classical republican political theory on Jefferson’s idealized agrarianism.)

  • Marsh, J. (1976) Selected Works of James Marsh, intro. P.C. Carafiol, Delmar, NY: Scholars Facsimiles and Reprints, 3 vols.

    (Volume 1 contains the 1829 edition of S.T. Coleridge’s Aids to Reflection, with Marsh’s preliminary essay – an important source for Emerson and Dewey.)

  • Miller, P. (1939) The New England Mind, New York: Macmillan.

    (Classic account of Covenant theology as it developed in New England between the first and second Puritan generations.)

  • Perry, R.B. (1935) The Thought and Character of William James, Boston, MA: Little Brown & Company; repr. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 1995.

    (Affectionate and philosophically sophisticated account of James and his work).

  • Pocock, J.G.A. (1975) The Machiavellian Moment: Florentine Political Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    (Magisterial summary of the classical republic political tradition from Aristotle to Jefferson. Claims that English Opposition thought – Bolingbroke, Trenchard and Gordon – rather than Locke, was the real source of revolutionary theory in the colonies.)

  • Rockefeller, S.C. (1991) John Dewey: Religious Faith and Democratic Humanism, New York and Oxford: Columbia University Press.

    (Contains an account of Dewey’s early development as a Hegelian idealist and Christian social activist.)

  • Schneider, H. (1963) A History of American Philosophy, New York: Columbia University Press, 2nd edn.

    (Classic study, containing a good bibliography of primary sources.)

  • West, C. (1989) The American Evasion of Philosophy: A Genealogy of Pragmatism, Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press.

    (Political and prophetic interpretation of American philosophy, beginning with Emerson.)

  • Wills, G. (1978) Inventing America: Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence, Garden City, NY: Doubleday.

    (Scottish moral sense theory as the origin of the language of rights in the American constitution.)

  • Wright, C. (1877) Philosophical Discussions, ed. C.E. Norton; repr. New York: Burt Franklin, 1971.

    (Contains ‘Evolution of Consciousness’ (199–266) and other writings on Darwinian theory.)

  • Zuckert, M. (1994) Natural Rights and the New Republicanism, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    (Reasserts the importance of Locke’s influence on American political thought.)

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Citing this article:
Goodman, Russell B.. Bibliography. American philosophy in the 18th and 19th centuries, 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-DC096-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/american-philosophy-in-the-18th-and-19th-centuries/v-1/bibliography/american-philosophy-in-the-18th-and-19th-centuries-bib.
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