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Help and beneficence

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-L035-1
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DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-L035-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/help-and-beneficence/v-1

References and further reading

  • Aiken, W. and La Follette, H. (1996) World Hunger and Morality, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

    (Useful introductory collection on the topic.)

  • Cohen, J. (1981) ‘Who is Starving Whom?’, Theoria 157: 65–81.

    (Defends a principle of beneficence requiring people to do only their ‘fair share’.)

  • Kagan, S. (1989) The Limits of Morality, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (Defends a maximizing principle of beneficence.)

  • Kant, I. (1797) Metaphysische Anfangsgründe der Tugendlehre, trans. J.W. Ellington, Metaphysical Principles of Virtue, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Company, 1964.

    (Advocates less stringent principle of beneficence.)

  • Locke, J. (1690) Two Treatises of Government, ed. P. Laslett, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1963.

    (Suggests we are required to meet the serious needs of any person.)

  • Murphy, L. (1993) ‘The Demands of Beneficence’, Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (4): 267–292.

    (General discussion of the problem of demands and defence of a principle of beneficence requiring people to sacrifice only as much as it would be optimal to sacrifice under full compliance.)

  • Nagel, T. (1986) The View From Nowhere, New York: Oxford University Press, ch. 10.

    (Influential general discussion of the problem of demands.)

  • O’Neill, O. (1989) ‘The Great Maxims of Justice and Charity’, in Constructions of Reason, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Defends a broadly Kantian approach, and includes a very helpful discussion of the liberal egalitarian interpretation of benficence.)

  • Paul, E.F., Miller, F.D. and Paul, J. (1987) Beneficence, Philanthropy and the Public Good, New York: Blackwell.

    (Collection devoted to beneficence, offering a variety of approaches.)

  • Paul, E.F., Miller, F.D. and Paul, J. (1993) Altruism, New York: Cambridge University Press.

    (Collection featuring different perspectives on altruism.)

  • Rawls, J. (1971) A Theory of Justice, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    (Influential contemporary theory of justice.)

  • Ross, W.D. (1930) The Right and the Good, Oxford: Clarendon Press; repr., Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Company, 1988.

    (Advocates the principle of beneficence as one among others.)

  • Scheffler, S. (1992) Human Morality, New York: Oxford University Press.

    (Defends limits to required sacrifice.)

  • Singer, P. (1972) ‘Famine, Affluence, and Morality’, Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (3): 229–243; repr. in W. Aiken and H. La Follette (eds) World Hunger and Morality, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1996.

    (Influential article, claiming that morality requires us to sacrifice our interests for those in the developing world.)

  • Unger, P. (1996) Living High and Leting Die, New York: Oxford University Press.

    (Extensive discussion of the difficulty of distinguishing between rescue cases and non-rescue cases, and defence of a stringent requirement to help those in need.)

  • Williams, B. (1981) ‘Persons, Character and Morality’, in Moral Luck: Philosophical Papers 1973–80, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Criticism of the strict impartiality of modern moral theory.)

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Citing this article:
Murphy, Liam B.. Bibliography. Help and beneficence, 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-L035-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/help-and-beneficence/v-1/bibliography/help-and-beneficence-bib.
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