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Mimēsis

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-A071-1
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-A071-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved July 21, 2019, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/mimesis/v-1

Article Summary

A crucial term in the literary theories of Plato and Aristotle, mimesis describes the relation between the words of a literary work and the actions and events they recount. In Plato, the term usually means ‘imitation’ and suggests that poetry is derived from and inferior to reality; in Aristotle, it loses this pejorative connotation and tends to mean simply ‘representation’ and to indicate that the world presented in a poem is much like, but not identical with, our own.

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Citing this article:
Most, Glenn W.. Mimēsis, 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-A071-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/mimesis/v-1.
Copyright © 1998-2019 Routledge.

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