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Mind and body in early modern philosophy

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-V043-1
Published
2016
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-V043-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 2016
Retrieved December 12, 2018, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/mind-and-body-in-early-modern-philosophy/v-1

References and further reading

  • Bayle, P. (1991 [1696]) 'Dictionnaire historique et critique', in R. Popkin (trans.) Historical and Critical Dictionnary, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.

    (Bayle’s major philosophical work, which was very popular in its day.)

  • Berkeley, G. (1948-1957 [1713]) 'Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous', in A. A. Luce and T. E. Jessop (eds) The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne,, vol. 2, Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson.

    (A series of dialogues in which two characters, one of them clearly representing Berkeley, discuss arguments for and against his immaterialist view. Luce and Jessop’s edition is the standard edition of Berkeley’s works.)

  • Cavendish, M. (2001 [1666]) Observations upon Experimental Philosophy, ed. E. O’Neill, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (In this book Cavendish discusses the views of philosophers associated with the early Royal Society. It is currently the only one of Cavendish’s works of natural philosophy of which there is a complete modern edition.)

  • Daniel, G. (1690) La voyage du monde de Descartes,, Paris.

    (An anti-Cartesian work by the Jesuit author Gabriel Daniel (1649-1728), which is cited by Bayle.)

  • Descartes, R. (1985 [1637]) 'Discours de la méthode pour bien conduir sa raison et chercher la vérité dans les sciences plus la dioptrique, les meteores, et la geometrie, qui sont des essais de cete methode (Discourse on the Method for Properly Conducting Reason and Searching for Truth in the Sciences, as well as the Dioptrics, the Meteors, and the Geometry, which are Essays in this Method)', in J. Cottingham, R. Stoothoff, D. Murdoch and A. Kenny (eds and trans.) The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, vol. 1, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (This was Descartes’s first published work. The Discourse served as an introduction to a collection of three scientific works.)

  • Descartes, R. (1984 [1641]) 'Meditationes de prima philosophia (Meditations on First Philosophy)', in J. Cottingham, R. Stoothoff, D. Murdoch and A. Kenny (eds and trans.) The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, vol. 2, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Descartes’s Meditations were published with six sets of objections from other philosophers and Descartes’s replies. These include the objections of Hobbes and Gassendi. A seventh set of objections was added in the 1642 edition.)

  • Descartes, R. (2007 [1643]) 'Letter to Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia of 21 May 1643' in L. Shapiro (ed. and trans.) The Correspondence between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes, Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press.

    (The letter in which Descartes presents his theory of the three primitive notions.)

  • Elisabeth, Princess of Bohemia (2007 [1643]) 'Letter to René Descartes of 6 May 1643' in L. Shapiro (ed. and trans.) The Correspondence between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes, Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press.

    (The first letter of Elisabeth’s correspondence with Descartes, in which she poses her initial question about mind–body interaction.)

  • Gassendi, P. (1984 [1641]) 'Objectiones quintae (Fifth Objections)', in J. Cottingham, R. Stoothoff, D. Murdoch and A. Kenny (eds and trans.) The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, vol. 2, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Gassendi’s initial published objections to Descartes’s Meditations.)

  • Gassendi, P. (1644) Disquisitio metaphysica. Seu, dubitationes et instantiae adversus Renati Cartesii Metaphysicam, & responsa, Amsterdam: Johann Blaev.

    (Gassendi’s further book of replies and objections to Descartes.)

  • Hobbes, T. (1984 [1641]) 'Objectiones tertiae, cum responsionibus authoris (Third Set of Objections with the Author’s Replies)', in J. Cottingham, R. Stoothoff, D. Murdoch and A. Kenny (eds and trans.) The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, vol. 2, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Hobbes’s published objections to Descartes’s Meditations, along with Descartes’s replies.)

  • Hobbes, T. (2012 [1651]) Leviathan, ed. N. Malcolm, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    (Hobbes’s most famous work of political philosophy. A Latin edition was published in 1668, with some changes in the content. Malcolm’s is now the standard edition, but many other useful editions are available.)

  • d’Holbach, P.-H. Thiry, Baron (1868 [1770]) Système de la nature (System of Nature), trans. H. D. Robinson, Boston, MA: J.P. Mendum.

    (A significant work of Holbach’s, in which he presents his materialism, as well as defending atheism.)

  • Hume, D. (2001 [1739]) A Treatise of Human Nature, ed. D. Fate Norton and M. J. Norton, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    (Hume’s first philosophical book, containing an extended account of many aspects of the human mind as well as forceful expressions of sceptical views. References are by book, part, section and paragraph.)

  • Kant, I. (1999 [1781]) Kritik der reinen Vernunft (Critique of Pure Reason), trans. P. Guyer and A. Wood, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (An enormously influential work in which Kant presented his later (‘critical’) views. Though reason is the designated topic, this also addresses in its own way many metaphysical topics, such as substance, the soul, causation and God. References are to pages of the first (A) edition.)

  • Leibniz, G. W. (1989 [1695]) 'A New System of the Nature and Communication of Substances, and of the Union of the Soul and Body', in R. Ariew and D. Garber (trans. and ed.), Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.

    (Leibniz’s first published account of his mature philosophical system.)

  • Leibniz, G. W. (1989 [1695]) 'A New System of the Nature and Communication of Substances, and of the Union of the Soul and Body', in R. Ariew and D. Garber (trans. and ed.), Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.

    (Leibniz’s first published account of his mature philosophical system.)

  • Leibniz, G. W. (1989 [1704]) 'Letter to Burcher de Volder of 30 June 1704', in R. Ariew and D. Garber (trans. and ed.), Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.

    (Part of an extended correspondence between Leibniz and de Volder, who was a professor at the University of Leiden.)

  • Leibniz, G. W. (1989 [1714]) 'The Principles of Philosophy, or, the Monadology', in R. Ariew and D. Garber (trans. and ed.), Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.

    (A famous essay in which Leibniz summarizes some main principles of his philosophical system.)

  • Leibniz, G. W. (1989 [1715]) 'Leibniz’s First Paper, Being an Extract of a Letter', in R. Ariew and D. Garber (trans. and ed.), Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.

    (The first letter in Leibniz’s correspondence with Samuel Clarke (1675–1729).)

  • Locke, J. (1975 [1689]) An Essay concerning Human Understanding, ed. P. H. Nidditch, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    (Locke’s major work on the nature and workings of the human mind, covering such topics as the origin of ideas, the nature of knowledge and the workings of language. References are by book, chapter and section.)

  • Malebranche, N. (1997 [1974-1975]) De la recherché de la vérité (The Search after Truth), trans. T. Lennon and P. J. Olscamp, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Malebranche’s first and longest philosophical work, it is divided into six books, on the senses, the imagination, the understanding, the inclinations, the passions and method.)

  • Malebranche, N. (1997 [1678]) Entretiens sur la métaphysique et sur la religion (Dialogues on Metaphysics and on Religion), ed. N. Jolley, trans. D. Scott, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (A discussion of metaphysical issues including Malebranche’s occasionalism – see in particular the Seventh Dialogue.)

  • La Mettrie, J.O. de (1996 [1747]) 'L’homme machine', in A. Thomson (ed. and trans.) Machine Man and Other Writings, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (This book’s title is sometimes translated as ‘Man a Machine’. It is a somewhat polemical account of, and argument for, materialism.)

  • Spinoza, B. (1988 [1677]) 'Ethica ordine geometrico demonstrata (Ethics Demonstrated in Geometrical Order)', in E. Curley (ed. and trans.) The Collected Works of Spinoza, vol. 1, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    (Spinoza’s main metaphysical and ethical work. References to parts of this work are by part, proposition, etc., rather than by page number.)

  • Wolff, C. (2009 [1720]) Vernünftige Gedanken von Gott, der Welt und der Seele des Menschen, auch allen Dingen überhaupt (Rational Thoughts on God, the World, and the Soul of Beings, Also all Things in General), extracts in Kants’s Critique of Pure Reason: Background Source Materials, ed. and trans.E. Watkins, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (This is the work also known as Wolff’s ‘German Metaphysics’. In quoting from this text I omit Wolff’s references to other sections of the book.)

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Citing this article:
Duncan, Stewart. Bibliography. Mind and body in early modern philosophy, 2016, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-V043-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/mind-and-body-in-early-modern-philosophy/v-1/bibliography/mind-and-body-in-early-modern-philosophy-bib.
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