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DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-C025-1
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-C025-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved September 24, 2020, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/molinism/v-1

Article Summary

Molinism, named after Luis de Molina, is a theological system for reconciling human freedom with God’s grace and providence. Presupposing a strongly libertarian account of freedom, Molinists assert against their rivals that the grace whereby God cooperates with supernaturally salvific acts is not intrinsically efficacious. To preserve divine providence and foreknowledge, they then posit ‘middle knowledge’, through which God knows, prior to his own free decrees, how any possible rational agent would freely act in any possible situation. Beyond this, they differ among themselves regarding the ground for middle knowledge and the doctrines of efficacious grace and predestination.

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Citing this article:
Freddoso, Alfred J.. Molinism, 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-C025-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/molinism/v-1.
Copyright © 1998-2020 Routledge.

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