Access to the full content is only available to members of institutions that have purchased access. If you belong to such an institution, please log in or find out more about how to order.


Print

Contents

Prolēpsis

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-A137-1
Published
2002
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-A137-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 2002
Retrieved May 25, 2019, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/prolepsis/v-1

Article Summary

In post-Aristotelian Greek philosophy, the term prolēpsis (plural prolēpseis) was used, first by Epicurus and then by the Stoics, to refer to basic general concepts. These concepts were held to be preconditions of rational thought and language. For the most part, the Epicureans and Stoics thought that prolēpseis were formed by experience.

Print
Citing this article:
Scott, Dominic. Prolēpsis, 2002, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-A137-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/prolepsis/v-1.
Copyright © 1998-2019 Routledge.

Related Searches

Periods

Related Articles