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Slingshot arguments

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-N122-1
Published
2005
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-N122-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 2005
Retrieved June 26, 2019, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/slingshot-arguments/v-1

Article Summary

Slingshot arguments form a family of arguments designed to make theories of facts collapse by showing that there is at most one fact, or that all true propositions are made true by or correspond to all facts, or similar conclusions. Slingshot arguments attempt to derive these undesirable consequences by showing that certain sentential connectives are truth-functional. The two most famous slingshots are associated with the names of Davidson and Gödel.

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Citing this article:
Rodriguez-Pereyra, Gonzalo. Slingshot arguments, 2005, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-N122-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/slingshot-arguments/v-1.
Copyright © 1998-2019 Routledge.

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