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Intersubjectivity

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-W054-1
Published
2017
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-W054-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 2017
Retrieved April 15, 2021, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/intersubjectivity/v-1

Article Summary

Intersubjectivity is the shared or mutual understanding among agents. Edmond Husserl first developed the concept of intersubjectivity as a critique of René Descartes’ problem of other minds. Husserl argued that the problem of other minds portrayed human interaction as inappropriately solipsistic. More recently, the concept of intersubjectivity has played a role in phenomenological accounts of social cognition, embodied and enactive cognition, debates about whether we can directly perceive others’ mental states, collective intentionality, and group minds.

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Citing this article:
Spaulding, Shannon. Intersubjectivity, 2017, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-W054-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/thematic/intersubjectivity/v-1.
Copyright © 1998-2021 Routledge.

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