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Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm (1646–1716)

DOI
10.4324/9780415249126-DA052-1
DOI: 10.4324/9780415249126-DA052-1
Version: v1,  Published online: 1998
Retrieved January 23, 2019, from https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/leibniz-gottfried-wilhelm-1646-1716/v-1

List of works

Many of Leibniz’s writings, including some of the most important of them, remained unpublished during his lifetime. As a consequence, some of them can be dated only approximately.

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1768) Leibnitii opera omnia (The complete works of Leibniz), ed. L. Dutens, Geneva, 6 vols; repr. Hildesheim: Olms, 1989.

    (Contains a wide range of Leibniz’s papers, both inside and outside philosophy, many of which have not been reprinted since the eighteenth century. It gives the best sense of what Leibniz meant to his contemporaries.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1849–63) Mathematische Schriften (Mathematical writings), ed. C.I. Gerhardt, Berlin and Halle: A. Asher & comp. and H.W. Schmidt, 7 vols; repr. Hildesheim: Olms, 1962.

    (Still the most complete collection of Leibniz’s papers and letters in mathematics and physics, in the original languages, many of which are directly connected to his more philosophical interests.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1875–90) Die philosophischen Schriften (Philosophical writings), ed. C.I. Gerhardt, Berlin: Weidmannsche Buchhandlung, 7 vols; repr. Hildesheim: Olms, 1978.

    (Still the most complete collection of Leibniz’s philosophical papers and letters in the original languages.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1923–) Sämtliche Schriften und Briefe (Collected writings and letters), ed. Deutsche Akademie der Wissenschaften (before 1945, Preussische), Berlin: Akademie Verlag.

    (This is to be the new complete critical edition of Leibniz’s writings in the original languages, edited to the highest standards. Currently still in its early stages, it must be supplemented by earlier editions. In recent years it has been supplemented by a ‘Vorausedition’, giving pre-prints of editorial work in progress.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1666) Dissertatio de arte combinatoria (Dissertation on the art of combinations), Leipzig; repr. in Die philosophischen Schriften, vol. 4; partial trans. L.E. Loemker in Philosophical Papers and Letters, Dordrecht: Reidel, 1969.

    (Leibniz’s first important publication, concerning the theory of mathematical combinations, together with various philosophical digressions. It also contains a suggestion of his later concern with a universal language.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (c. 1680–2) De libertate (On freedom), in Textes inédites, vol. 1, ed. G. Grua, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1948; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Interesting essay on human and divine freedom and contingency, unpublished in Leibniz’s lifetime.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1684a) ‘Meditationes de cognitione, veritate et ideis’ (Meditations on knowledge, truth and ideas), Acta Eruditorum (November 1684): 537–542; repr. in Leibnitii opera omnia, vol. 4; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Important explanation of Leibniz’s views on concepts, truth and knowledge.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1684b) Mars Christianissimus (Most Christian War-God), Cologne; trans. P. Riley in Leibniz: Political Writings, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.

    (A satire on the diplomatic policies of Louis XIV.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1686a) ‘Brevis Demonstratio erroris memorabilis Cartesii’ (Brief demonstration of a notable error of Descartes), Acta Eruditorum (March 1686): 161–163; repr. in Mathematische Schriften, vol. 6; trans. L.E. Loemker in Philosophical Papers and Letters, Dordrecht: Reidel, 1969.

    (A refutation of Descartes’ law of the conservation of quantity of motion in physics.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1686b) Discours de métaphysique (Discourse on metaphysics), 1846; ed. H. Lestienne, Paris: Alcan, 1907; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Unpublished in Leibniz’s time, this is a central text in which Leibniz gives an exposition of some central elements of his metaphysics as of 1686.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1686–90) The Leibniz–Arnauld Correspondence; repr. with related letters and documents in Die philosophischen Schriften, vol. 2: Weidmannsche Buchhandlung, 1875–90, 1956; trans. and ed. H.T. Mason, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1967.

    (Very important series of letters exchanged between Leibniz and the Cartesian philosopher Antoine Arnauld just as Leibniz was setting out his mature philosophy, providing a kind of commentary on themes developed in the Discourse. Although unpublished in his lifetime, Leibniz probably intended it for publication.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (c. 1689a) De libertate (On Freedom), in Textes inédites, vol. 1, ed. G. Grua, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1948; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Another essay on contingency and freedom, unpublished in Leibniz’s lifetime, which makes use of his infinite analysis account of contingency.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1689b) Primae veritates (First truths); repr. in Opuscules et fragments inédits, 1903; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (An important, unpublished summary of Leibniz’s metaphysics as of the 1680s. Originally thought to have preceded the 1686 composition of the Discourse, it is now firmly dated at 1689.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1690) Dynamica (Dynamics), in Mathematische Schriften, vol. 6; partial trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Unpublished in Leibniz’s time, this is a systematic exposition of Leibniz’s physics. Apart from the translation of the preliminary discourse in Ariew and Garber, the bulk of this work has not been translated from the original Latin.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1692) Protogaea, 1749; French trans, ed. B. de Saint-Germain and J.-M. Barrande, Toulouse: Presses Universitaires du Mirail, 1993.

    (A treatise on geology and the early days of the earth, written as the first part of Leibniz’s history of the House of Hanover.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1693) Codex Iuris Gentium Diplomaticus (The diplomatic code of the law of nations), Hanover; partial trans. P. Riley in Leibniz: Political Writings, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.

    (Collection of diplomatic papers, with a long introduction on political philosophy.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (c. 1694–8) La félicité (Felicity); repr. in Textes inédites, vol. 1; trans. P. Riley in Leibniz: Political Writings, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.

    (Important but unpublished note from the 1690s in which Leibniz discusses his theory of justice as the charity of the wise man.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1695a) Specimen dynamicum (A specimen of dynamics), Part I, Acta Eruditorum (April 1695); repr. (Parts I and II) in Mathematische Schriften, vol. 4; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Important work that links the technical physics of the Dynamica with more philosophical themes. Only Part I was published during Leibniz’s life.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1695b) ‘Système nouveau de la nature et de la communication des substances’ (New system of the nature and the communication of substances), Journal des Sçavans (27 June 1695): 294–300; repr. in Die philosophischen Schriften, vol. 4; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (A popular presentation of Leibniz’s metaphysics, featuring the first public presentation of the hypothesis of pre- established harmony.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1695c) Dialogue effectif sur la liberté de l’homme et sur l’origine du mal (An actual dialogue on human freedom and on the origin of evil); repr. in Textes inédites, vol. 1; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (This seems to be a record of a dialogue that actually took place between Leibniz and Baron Dobrzensky, counsellor of state and war of Brandenburg.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1696) ‘Remarques sur les Objections de M. Foucher’ (Remarks on the objections of M. Foucher), Histoire des ouvrages des Savans (February 1696): 274–276; repr. in Die philosophischen Schriften, vol. 4; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (An excellent but brief account of Leibniz’s view on the problem of the continuum.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1697) De rerum originatione radicali (On the ultimate origination of things); repr. in Die philosophischen Schriften, vol. 7; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (This important brief essay on creation and contingency remained unpublished until the nineteenth century.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1698) ‘De ipsa natura’ (On nature itself), Acta Eruditorum (September 1698): 427–440; repr. in Die philosophischen Schriften, vol. 4; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Significant essay on the importance of introducing genuinely active individuals into the world, against the Cartesian position that bodies are bare, extended substances.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1702) ‘Note on Cartesian natural philosophy’; repr. in Die philosophischen Schriften, vol. 4; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Untitled by Leibniz and not published in his lifetime, this is an important summary of the philosophical aspects of Leibniz’s dynamics.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1702–3) Méditation sur la notion commune de la justice (Meditation on the common concept of justice); trans. P. Riley in Leibniz: Political Writings, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.

    (Unpublished in Leibniz’s lifetime, this is an important source for understanding his political philosophy.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1704) Nouveau essais sur l’entendement humain (New essays in human understanding), 1765; repr. in Sämtliche Schriften und Briefe, series 6, vol. 6; trans. P. Remnant and J. Bennett as New Essays on Human Understanding, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981.

    (Unpublished in Leibniz’s lifetime, this is a point- by-point discussion of Locke’s Essay Concerning Human Understanding.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1706) Monita quaedam ad S. Pufendorfii principia (Observations on the Principles of Pufendorf); repr. in Leibnitii opera omnia, vol. 4, part 3; trans. P. Riley in Leibniz: Political Writings, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.

    (Unpublished in his lifetime, these are Leibniz’s comments on the political thought of Samuel Pufendorf, the seventeenth-century jurist.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1710) Essais de Théodicée (Essays on Theodicy), Amsterdam; trans. E.M. Huggard as Theodicy, La Salle, IL: Open Court, 1985.

    (A treatise in which Leibniz attempts to justify the ways of God to man. Much of the work is a response to the writings of Pierre Bayle.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1712) Jugement sur les oeuvres de Mylord Shaftesbury (Judgment of the works of the Earl of Shaftesbury); repr. in Leibnitii opera omnia, vol. 5; trans. P. Riley in Leibniz: Political Writings, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.

    (Unpublished in Leibniz’s lifetime, this is a free-ranging discussion of Shaftesbury’s work that includes much of interest for Leibniz’s political thought.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1714a) Monadologie, 1721; repr. in Die philosophischen Schriften, vol. 6; critical edn, ed. A. Robinet, Principes de la nature et de la grâce…et Principes de la philosophie ou monadologie, Paris: PUF, 1986; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber as Monadology in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Central text, not published during his lifetime, in which Leibniz gives a summary of his metaphysics at the end of his life.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1714b) ‘Principes de la nature et de la grâce’ (Principles of nature and grace), Acta Eruditorum (September 1698): 427–440; repr. in Die philosophischen Schriften, vol. 6; critical edn, ed. A. Robinet, Principes de la nature et de la grâce…et Principes de la philosophie ou monadologie, Paris: PUF, 1986; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Another late summary of Leibniz’s metaphysics, a companion to the Monadology, also not published during his lifetime.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1714c) ‘De ipsa natura’ (On nature itself), Acta Eruditorum (September 1698): 427–440; repr. in Die philosophischen Schriften, vol. 4; trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber in Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company, 1989.

    (Significant essay on the importance of introducing genuinely active individuals into the world, against the Cartesian position that bodies are bare, extended substances.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1715–16) The Leibniz–Clarke Correspondence, 1717; trans. and ed. H.G. Alexander, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1956.

    (The Alexander edition has a useful introduction and notes to the translation of the exchange.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1903) Opuscules et fragments inédits (Unpublished short works and fragments), ed. L. Couturat, Paris: Alcan; repr. Hildesheim: Olms, 1966.

    (The first publication of many of Leibniz’s papers on logic, language, and related areas of metaphysics, published in the original languages; this collection shaped earlier twentieth-century views of Leibniz’s programme as driven by his logic.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1948) Textes inédites d’après les manuscrits de la bibliothèque provinciale de Hanovre (Unpublished texts, following the manuscripts in the provincial library at Hanover), ed. G. Grua, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2 vols; repr. New York: Garland, 1985.

    (The first publication, in the original languages, of a valuable selection of writings concentrating on ethical, political and theological subjects.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1966) Logical Papers, ed. and trans. G.H.R. Parkinson, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    (A collection of Leibniz’s logical papers, translated into English, with an extensive introduction.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1969) Philosophical Papers and Letters, ed. and trans. L.E. Loemker, Dordrecht: Reidel.

    (The most extensive collection of Leibniz’s writings in English, with a long introduction and useful notes.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1973) Philosophical Writings, ed. G.H.R. Parkinson, trans. M. Morris and G.H.R. Parkinson, London: Dent; Totowa, NJ: Rowman & Littlefield.

    (A useful collection in English translation.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1988) Leibniz: Political Writings, ed. and trans. P. Riley, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2nd edn.

    (An excellent collection of Leibniz’s moral and political writings, with a useful introduction.)

  • Leibniz, G.W. (1989) Leibniz: Philosophical Essays, ed. and trans. R. Ariew and D. Garber, Indianapolis, IN and Cambridge, MA: Hackett Publishing Company.

    (A widely available translation of a selection of Leibniz’s most important philosophical texts.)

References and further reading

  • Adams, R.M. (1994) Leibniz: Determinist, Theist, Idealist, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    (An important recent monograph that focuses on questions of contingency, natural theology, substance and body in Leibniz. Highly recommended for the serious student.)

  • Aiton, E.J. (1985) Leibniz: A Biography, Bristol: Hilger.

    (A recent biography in English.)

  • Broad, C.D. (1975) Leibniz: an Introduction, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (Though somewhat dated, still a good philosophical introduction to Leibniz’s thought.)

  • Couturat, L. (1901) La logique de Leibniz d’après des documents inédits (The logic of Leibniz from unpublished documents), Paris: Alcan; repr. Hildesheim: Olms, 1961.

    (Still the best study of Leibniz’s programme for logic and related areas.)

  • Duchesneau, F. (1994) La Dynamique de Leibniz (Leibniz’s Dynamics), Paris: Vrin.

    (A good recent study of Leibniz’s programme for physics.)

  • Frankfurt, H. (1972) Leibniz: A Collection of Critical Essays, New York: Doubleday Anchor.

    (Contains many classic essays, including those of Russell and Couturat.)

  • Gueroult, M. (1967) Leibniz: dynamique et métaphysique (Leibniz: Dynamics and Metaphysics), Paris: Aubier.

    (A classic study of the connection between Leibniz’s dynamics and his metaphysics.)

  • Ishiguro, H. (1972) Leibniz’s Philosophy of Logic and Language, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2nd edn, 1990.

    (A good study focusing on questions relating to logic and language.)

  • Jolley, N. (1995) The Cambridge Companion to Leibniz, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (A recent collection of articles surveying the various aspects of Leibniz’s thought, but focusing on his philosophy.)

  • Mercer, C. (1998, forthcoming) Leibniz’s Metaphysics: Its Origins and Development, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    (A lively study of Leibniz’s early philosophy and how it evolved into the mature thought.)

  • Müller, K. and Krönert, G. (1969) Leben und Werk von G.W. Leibniz. Eine Chronik (The life and work of G.W. Leibniz: a chronology), Frankfurt: Klostermann.

    (An exhaustive summary of what is known about Leibniz’s life, whereabouts, and when he was working on what, with documentation, arranged chronologically.)

  • Ravier, E. (1937) Bibliographie des Oeuvres de Leibniz (Bibliography of the works of Leibniz), Paris: Alcan; repr. Hildesheim: Olms, 1966.

    (Despite some inaccuracies, the best guide to the publication of Leibniz’s writings, from his lifetime to the 1930s.)

  • Russell, B. (1937) A Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz, London: Allen & Unwin, 2nd edn.

    (Advances the view that Leibniz’s metaphysics is grounded in his formal logic. While the main thesis is now generally rejected, it was highly influential, and the book contains many still-valuable discussions.)

  • Rutherford, D. (1995) Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature, Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press.

    (Ascribes the systematic unity of Leibniz’s thought to his vision of the best of all possible worlds.)

  • Sleigh, R.C. (1990) Leibniz & Arnauld. A Commentary on their Correspondence, New Haven, CT, and London: Yale University Press.

    (While it focuses on what Leibniz was thinking in the crucial mid-1680s, this is also an excellent commentary on some of the most important philosophical themes in Leibniz’s thought. Highly recommended for the serious student.)

  • Studia Leibnitiana (1969–), Weisbaden: Steiner Verlag.

    (A journal that focuses on studies of Leibniz and his age. In addition to its regular issues, it also publishes numerous supplementary volumes containing collections of essays, conference proceedings, and short monographs that pertain to Leibniz and related issues in the history of philosophy.)

  • Voltaire, F.M. de (1759) Candide, ou l’optimisme (Candide, or optimism), Paris.

    (A caricature of Leibniz appears in this popular tale in the person of Dr Pangloss. It is available in numerous modern editions, both in French and in English translation.)

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Citing this article:
Garber, Daniel. Bibliography. Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm (1646–1716), 1998, doi:10.4324/9780415249126-DA052-1. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Taylor and Francis, https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/biographical/leibniz-gottfried-wilhelm-1646-1716/v-1/bibliography/leibniz-gottfried-wilhelm-1646-1716-bib.
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